Richard A. Henson Medical Simulation Center

Naming Opportunities

Medical Simulation Center

The Salisbury University Medical Simulation Center will continually evolve as a state-of-the-science education center allowing students and health care professionals in the region to practice clinical decision-making using high-fidelity mannequins driven by computerized scenario-based software simulating birth, infants who are healthy and ill, complications of prematurity, and children and adults with various disease states and injuries. Sophisticated computer software manipulates the high-fidelity mannequin's responses in real-time resulting in a mannequin that responds just as a human would. In encounters with standardized patients (trained actors), learners refine their communication skills and ability to effectively manage the care of people with mental health disorders. Video and sound of every interaction with the medical simulators or standardized patients is digitally captured for later review and critique by learners and faculty. Through this debriefing process of their own performance as well as coaching from the faculty, each learner is well prepared to intervene in all situations before entering into real-life patient care. Additionally learners work with the latest healthcare equipment, and documentation and data retrieval from electronic medical records, all of which prepare them for a smooth transition to live clinical care.

For more information on how you can make a gift to the Richard A. Henson Medical Simulation Center please contact Jayme Block at 410-543-6156 or jeblock@salisbury.edu.

Click [Learn More] to find out more about opportunities for each facility.

 
Facility Amount Status      
Pediatric Simulation Area $200,000 Available [-]

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 Pediatric Simulation Area

In this area, students will learn how to care for acute and chronically ill children who range in age from a few days old through adolescence. Live clinical experiences with very sick children is limited on the eastern shore for obvious reasons — very sick children need highly specialized care, available only in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Wilmington, DE. Even at area hospitals, opportunities for experiences with hospitalized children are unpredictable. Nervous parents and anxious students compound this situation.

Learning through simulations is especially important in this high-risk, unpredictable specialty. Not only will it assure that all students have a minimum number of simulated experiences to prepare them for the "real world," it will reduce their anxiety when they do care for live patients. In addition, students will have opportunities to use specialized medical equipment for children and learn to adapt it to a home setting.

This area is designed to replicate several clinical settings: an acute care pediatric hospital room with a child in a crib or youth bed (e.g. pneumonia, diabetes, fractures, post-operative care, gastroenteritis), an emergency department setting with a child on a stretcher needing quick attention (asthma attack, bicycle accident, accidental poisoning), a medical office (routine check-up), or home (cancer care). Simulations are designed to move from relatively simple to very complex as students’ progress through the semester. In addition, some simulations will require inter-disciplinary collaboration, thus students from nursing and respiratory therapy will work side-by-side to provide patient care.

Equipped with a high-fidelity human patient simulator that resembles a 7-8 year old, students will work in groups of 2-3 to refine clinical skills, decision-making, team work, and age-appropriate teaching for the child, parent, and family.

A high-fidelity adult mannequin may be used periodically for simulations with older adolescents. Similarly, some scenarios may be built around a high-fidelity “baby” using a mannequin that resembles a 3-6 month old.

Each simulation will be video-captured for review by students and faculty at a later time. Besides critiquing themselves, students receive feedback from faculty and peers, and have the opportunity to repeat simulations to refine their skills.

 

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Adult Care Simulation Area $200,000 Available [-]

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Adult Care Simulation Area

This area is designed to handle a number of various patient scenarios; from the student’s first experience of caring for a sick adult patient on the general wards to handling the intensity of an adult patient in cardiac arrest.

Adult mannequin simulators will provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills on simulated patients in the early stages of their illness progressing through to critical illness. The team-based approach to caring for critically ill patients is known to improve patient outcomes, and that will be the hallmark of this room.

In addition to the high-tech mannequins, this room will provide the opportunity for the students to work with other state-of-the-science equipment such as mechanical ventilators, intensive care monitors, defibrillators, and complex intravenous infusion equipment.

Teaching health care students from various professions how to work together in high-stress environments while caring for various simulated disease states is the goal for this room.

Each simulation scenario will be video-captured for review by students and faculty so that by the time the student enters the actual clinical setting and care for these high-risk patients, the students will have confidence in their knowledge and their ability to care for the patients they see.

 

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Labor/Delivery/Recovery/Post-Partum (LDRP) Simulation Area $200,000 Available [-]

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Labor/Delivery/Recovery/Post-Partum (LDRP) Simulation Area

Labor and delivery are important aspects of health care, but they are highly unpredictable and high risk, even under the best circumstances. The LDRP will provide a realistic setting, equipped with all the supplies and devices normally found in this area. Students will learn obstetrical care with a focus on safety and teamwork in a highly controlled environment.

Clinical scenarios will be conducted using a computerized high-fidelity mannequin and fetal heart rate simulator equipment to mimic normal labor as well as common complications. Since some obstetrical procedures cannot be easily simulated, role-playing or standardized patients will be also used.

As scenarios unfold, pairs of students will monitor maternal blood pressure, pulse, heart rate and oxygen saturation, evaluate information from fetal monitoring, as well as perform various clinical skills including urinary catheterization, IV insertion, and pain management. Students will learn Leopold’s maneuvers, the phases of labor, how to check for cervix dilation and fetal presentation, and cardinal movements during delivery. A third student will work with the labor coach assisting with breathing and relaxation techniques.

Scenarios will move from uncomplicated vaginal deliveries to complications with mother and baby. Working in interdisciplinary teams, students will practice clinical decision-making as they manage maternal seizures, fetal distress as well as breech deliveries, shoulder dystocia, and postpartum hemorrhage.

With simulated birth, 1-2 students will evaluate a high-fidelity simulated newborn mannequin, provide immediate care or resuscitation as needed. Since the newborn simulator can breath and change color, students will engage in advanced assessment (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate/depth) and evaluation of electrocardiogram. Students learn to use specialized equipment associated with this area including an infant warmer, T-piece resuscitator, mechanical ventilator, and infusions via umbilical lines.

Each scenario will be video-captured for review by students and faculty at a later time. Besides critiquing themselves, students receive feedback from faculty and peers, and have the opportunity to repeat simulations to refine their skills.

 

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Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Simulation Area $150,000 Available [-]

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Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Simulation Area

Designed to replicate a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), this lab will provide the opportunity for student to learn and practice their skills in caring for premature babies and those with serious, life-threatening conditions without posing any danger to real patients and their anxious parents. Live clinical experiences with premature and sick babies are limited for obvious reasons-very sick infants require highly specialized care, available only in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Wilmington, DE. Even at area hospitals, opportunities for experiences with premature infants and medically unstable infants are unpredictable and high stakes.

Learning through simulations is critical in this high-risk specialty. Not only will it assure that all students have a minimum number of simulated experiences to prepare them for the "real world," it will reduce their anxiety when they do care for live patients. In addition, students will have opportunities to use highly specialized medical equipment. Fundamental safety issues will be integrated into every scenario including hand washing, patient identification, and safe medication administration.

Two different high-fidelity mannequins will be used in this area, one to simulate a premature baby and one to simulate a full-term medically unstable baby. Scenarios featuring experiences a premature baby might go through, including placement of a central line placement, recovering from cardiac surgery, sepsis, and management and prevention of chronic lung disease, will help students learn how to provide safe and effective care. As students make decisions, the mannequin-baby responds – if the student makes an incorrect choice the baby will start to deteriorate.

Baby Sim, the larger infant, breathes, has a heartbeat, blinks, cries tears, has changes in the size of his pupils, makes urine, and can coo. Students will have experiences managing such conditions as bronchiolitis, congenital heart abnormalities, sepsis, substance abuse, burns, and traumatic brain injury among others. Simulations are designed to move from relatively simple to very complex as students progress through the semester. In addition, some simulations will require inter-disciplinary collaboration, thus students from nursing and respiratory therapy will work side-by-side to provide patient care.

State-of-the art equipment will be used in this room including equipment for phototherapy, and infusion equipment.

Each simulation scenario will be video-captured for review by students and faculty at a later time. Besides critiquing themselves, students receive feedback from faculty and peers, and have the opportunity to repeat simulations to refine their skills.

 

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Mental Room Health Room #1 $125,000 Available [-]

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Mental Room Health Room #1

At the heart of all nursing care is excellent communication. Learning how to interact effectively with people who are stressed due to a change in health status is a critically important skill. In this area of the Simulation Center, students will schedule appointments to meet their standardized patients, trained actors who portray individuals with various emotional conditions from moderate anxiety to post-traumatic stress disorder. Following scripts developed by expert psych/mental health nursing faculty, the actors engage students in 20-30 minute encounters. Each encounter is video-recorded for review by students and faculty at a later time. Students receive feedback from faculty, peers, and standardized patients and have the opportunity to repeat encounters to improve their skills of interpersonal communication.

This area can be “staged” to resemble a counselor’s office or an emergency department psych/mental health intake area allowing students to advance in their skills of human interaction. It can also be easily transformed into a “medical office” setting for future nurse practitioner students to practice interviewing skills, taking a medical history, performing a physical examination, and providing patient and family education.

This area provides opportunities for students to learn how to establish a professional helping relationship, refine their verbal and non-verbal communication skills in one-to-one encounters, and develop strategies for intervening with individuals with common psychiatric disorders including depression, addictions, post-traumatic stress, bi-polar, and severe anxiety.

 

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Human Performance Area $100,000 Available [-]

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Human Performance Area

This area, also unique to the eastern shore, will allow faculty and students studying the physiology of exercise to explore the limits of human performance. Whether it be athletes interested in knowing how their training regiment is changing their exercise capacity or a faculty member interested in what processes can be used to improve a person’s ability to complete everyday activities of daily living, this room will provide an opportunity for that kind of study.

This room will contain state-of-the-science equipment that will allow the measurement of various physiological parameters associated to exercise capacity including measurement of metabolic rate, oxygen consumption during exercise, non-invasive blood flow to extremities. We expect that this room will not only serve as a room for educating students attending Salisbury University, but also provide a unique opportunity for local and area athletes to optimize their training regimens.

 

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Mental Room Health Room #2 $75,000 Available [-]

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Mental Room Health Room #2

This larger space is designed for group sessions where 1-2 students act as facilitators for a group of 3-4 standardized patients. The physical layout is such that the group can meet while seated on couches and comfortable chairs or around a table.

Following scripts developed by expert psych/mental health nursing faculty, the actors engage students in 20-30 minute group encounters. These encounters are video-recorded for review by students and faculty at a later time. Students receive feedback from faculty, peers, and standardized patients and have the opportunity to repeat encounters to refine their skills of interpersonal communication.

Student learning goals include: facilitating a group session when members have a variety of psych/mental health needs, managing disruptive behavior in a group, organizing a group activity, refining communication skills in more sophisticated encounters, and developing strategies for including all group members.

Additionally, this room can be used as described in psych/mental health room no. 1 for one-to-one student and standardized patient encounters or for nurse practitioner students for interview and treatment involving larger groups, e.g. parent(s) and child(ren).

 

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Debriefing Room $50,000 Available [-]

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Debriefing Room

Despite the glamour associated with high-fidelity human patient simulation, experts agree that debriefing is the single-most important aspect of a simulation experience. Debriefing is a structured learner-centric activity that focuses student thinking on what they did, how they did it, and what they can do better. The purpose of debriefing is to help learners sort out events, understand what happened and why. The focus is on self-discovery for deeper learning. Through a review of the video of the recorded simulation and faculty observations, the debriefing room provides a safe environment to help students see the strengths and weaknesses of their performance.

At the Simulation Center, the debriefing room provides comfortable seating for 8 around tables that can be reconfigured depending upon the size of the group. Two 55” flat panel televisions are mounted on one wall for easy viewing of multiple camera views of recordings as well as physiologic data from the simulators. A built-in credenza houses requisite computer equipment. This space resembles an executive conference room.

 

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Nurses Station $50,000 Available [-]

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Nurses Station

In a hospital setting, the nurses station is the hub of activity for all healthcare personnel whether to communicate face-to-face (via text or telephone) about patient needs or to scrutinize changing physiologic data and medical orders. The Simulation Center nurses station is no different as it serves all simulation areas. Several computers provide an interface with an electronic medical record providing students with direct access to sophisticated laboratory and diagnostic information, medical orders, and documentation of patient care services that have been provided. Working telephones connect each simulation lab to the nurses station providing a direct link for emergency communication.

At the nurses station, students beginning a simulation receive hand-off reports; other students collaborate with other healthcare professionals; another group of students reviews data from the electronic health record and corroborates medical orders.

Also located at the nurses station is a sophisticated computerized medication dispensing device. With patient safety at the forefront, use of this device is central to healthcare practice in hospitals.

Emergency carts, also known as "crash carts," "Code Blue carts," "resuscitation carts," are located at the nurses station. It is common practice to have these carts in a central location available to all Simulation Labs. Stocked with all emergency equipment used in a real code situation, students learn to manage patients with a compromised airway, initiative intravenous therapy, administer medications to restore and maintain a heartbeat, or shock a patient back to life. Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential to a smooth, coordinated response to a situation where a patient stops breathing or lacks a heartbeat.

 

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Control Rooms (6) $35,000 Available [-]

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Control Rooms (6)

Though small in square footage, these technology-packed rooms are the nerve-center of the Simulation Center. Designed in pairs, each control room will have the capability to remotely monitor any of the simulation rooms at any given time. The simulation operator will have the ability to manage the high-fidelity mannequin by changing the mannequin’s physiologic responses (pulse rate, breathing, blood pressure etc.), provide a voice for the mannequin, provide the voice on the phone (should students decide to call upon another health professional for advice and/or changes in medical orders), and operate all cameras in any room.

Each room is packed with high-tech equipment from voice-activated headsets, video-capture equipment, remote-controls for camera operations, to several flat panel computer displays as well as a built-in desk and comfortable desk chair on wheels.

 

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Mental Room Health Waiting Area $25,000 Available [-]

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Mental Room Health Waiting Area

Designed to resemble an attractive office waiting area, this space plays an important role in “setting the stage” for encounter appointments. A basic tenet of simulations is creating as real an environment as possible and suspending the student’s disbelief. As students enter the waiting area, they are expected to put on their game face. Cell phones and personal computers are not permitted and personal items are kept to a minimum. Time spent in this space is focused on preparing for the encounter.

 

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Simulation Waiting Area $25,000 Available [-]

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Simulation Waiting Area

Designed to resemble an attractive office waiting area, this space plays an important role in “setting the stage” for high-fidelity human patient simulation appointments. Appointments for simulations in the labor/delivery/postpartum/recovery area (LDRP), neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), Pediatrics (Peds), and Adult Care areas will typically be arranged for 3-4 students for each simulation area. A fundamental underpinning of simulations is the desire to emulate the “real thing” as closely as possible thus suspending the student’s belief this educational activity will be like all the rest. As students enter the waiting area, they are expected to put on their game face. They enter the building dressed in scrubs with stethoscopes in hand. Cell phones and personal computers are not permitted and personal items are kept to a minimum. Time spent in this space is focused on preparing for the simulation.

Comfortable seating is provided for 7-8 students with a wall of cubbies for non-secure storage of backpacks and coats. This space is shared with those waiting for appointments in the Human Performance Lab.

 

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Professional Office Space $20,000 Available [-]

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At the Simulation Center, two staff members will oversee daily operations. A full-time Simulation Specialist with expertise in the health care setting as well as running the high-fidelity mannequins, developing scenarios with faculty, scheduling simulation appointments, and managing the inventory of disposable supplies will have primary oversight of the facility. A half-time Tech Specialist will provide coverage of the center during evening and weekend hours.

Shared work space for the Simulation Center personnel is designed to be utilitarian with computer access for each as well as secure storage for equipment that is being evaluated or repaired.

 

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